Films

 

PROPERTY

This poignant, award-winning documentary short reveals a day in the life at the National Wildlife Property Repository—a little-known 22,000 square-foot warehouse outside of Denver where wildlife items confiscated at US ports of entry are stored. The Repository currently houses more than one million items. The film is told through the eyes of Doni Sprague, an employee who has worked there for 20 years cataloguing, tagging, bagging and shelving illegal wildlife items on a daily basis.

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keeper of the mountains

Elizabeth Hawley has interviewed thousands of Himalayan expedition leaders since arriving in Nepal in 1959. At 89, she is a force of nature every bit as impressive as any alpinist. This portrait of the world’s foremost authority on Himalayan mountaineering reflects the character it chronicles by being direct, sharp, and not without a sense of humor. 

"one of the best aventure films of 2013"---outside magazine

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news documentaries


cnn's great big story: running america's last linotype newspaper

“The Saguache Crescent” newspaper in Saguache, Colorado has been printing its news the same way since the 1800s. Publisher Dean Coombs’ family has had the business for three generations, and he has helped print out the weekly broadsheet on a linotype since he was 12 years old.

national geographic: new discovery of blood-red worms that thrive in a toxic cave

Sulfur Cave in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, is full of gases so toxic that a person who enters would pass out after just a few breaths. But tiny-blood-red worms, a newly discovered species that may not be found anywhere else on Earth, thrive in this extreme environment, devoid of sunlight. These tiny worms could even offer clues to the kinds of life that might be found on other planets.

national geographic:rehab squirrels get a second chance at life

At Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, north of Boulder, Colorado, injured and orphaned squirrels from all walks of life are fed, cared for, and eventually released back into the wild.Squirrels play a vital role in their ecosystem as a prey species, as well as spreading nuts and seeds from trees.

national geographic: EVERYTHING YOU WERE AFRAID TO ASK ABOUT ROADKILL

A museum in Denver, Colorado has invited donations of animals killed in vehicle collisions and other encounters with modern life. By preserving and studying the specimens, researchers are hoping for a better understanding of how well wild animals are coping with their changing habitats

national geographic: THE RETURN OF THE COLORADO RAINBOW SCARAB BEETLE

When the bison disappeared from the Colorado Plains, so did the Rainbow Scarab beetle. Now, bison are being reintroduced to the Plains, and Dr. Frank Krell, an entomologist with the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, has been searching beneath bison patties to see if the Colorado Rainbow Scarab is making a comeback as well. 

national geographiC: THE MEDICAL BENEFITS OF VENOMOUS INSECT STINGS 

For entomologist Justin Schmidt, getting stung by venomous insects is an occupational hazard. Schmidt collects and studies a variety of stinging insects such as harvest ants and Pacific cicada killers to discover the potential medical benefits of their venom.